North Carolina law does not expressly ban the use of a cellphone behind the wheel, and law enforcement cannot pull a driver over for talking on the phone. However, the laws fall in line with those in other states by banning texting while driving. Gain some knowledge about North Carolina’s distracted driving laws and what happens if a driver breaks them. 

Cellphone use limitations 

Increasing reliance on technology makes it difficult for people to put down the phone, even while driving. Many states, including North Carolina, have made it illegal to text while driving. Checking email, reading social media posts and the like all fall under this category. The fines for getting caught using a phone in this way may equate to $100 per infraction. For a driver under 18, the law bans talking on the phone without the use of a speakerphone or Bluetooth. 

More than cellphones 

Distracted driving encompasses more than just cell use behind the wheel, according to the North Carolina Department of Transportation. The following activities may severely impact a driver’s ability to pay attention to the road ahead: 

  • Eating or drinking 
  • Changing the radio station or listening at high volumes 
  • Talking to other people in the car 
  • Pets not properly restrained 

Drivers who stop or slow down to read road signs also pose a hazard to those around them. Distractions inside and outside the vehicle may result in a driver getting into an avoidable accident had he or she paid closer attention. Reaction time is slower when the eyes and the brain are not fully engaged in the task at hand. 

Distracted driving accidents have become as dangerous as those involving drivers under the influence of alcohol. As such, it is critical to do everything possible to stay on task behind the wheel.